Not So Big® Showhouse in Realtor Mag

Our Sarah Susanka designed showhouse on SchoolStreet was recently featured in Realtor Mag! Make sure to check out the article and watch the video tour by Sarah herself.

Designing on a Human Scale

Sarah Susanka’s newly-constructed ‘not so big house’ in Libertyville, Ill., provides smart ideas for comfortable living in fewer square feet.
DECEMBER 2011 | BY ERICA CHRISTOFFER

Walkable Communities are the Future of Housing

Bloomberg Businessweek published an article arguing for the value in transit-oriented development, T.O.D. meaning  projects located in walkable communities with easy access to public or mass transportation. In the story, Shaun Donovan, secretary of Housing and Urban Development, said, “The ghost towns of the housing bust are places that lack transportation options, that aren’t walkable. The average family spends 52 cents of every dollar they earn on housing and transportation combined, so the biggest opportunity is in development around transportation.”

Read the article:

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-12-06/walk-bike-to-work-in-salt-lake-s-answer-to-suburban-nightmares.html

Similar to the SchoolStreet project, StreetScape development is committed towards delivering sustainable projects through urban infill and Transit Oriented Development.

Sarah and John Interview with Residential Architect Magazine

Not So Big® Showhouse architect Sarah Suanaka, and StreetScape’s John McLinden sat down with Residential rchitect Magazine this week. Read the Original Article

q + a: sarah susanka, faia, and john mclinden on the not so big showhouse in libertyville, ill.

by: meghan drueding

On Nov. 19, Sarah Susanka’s 2,450-square-foot Not So Big (NSB) Showhouse in Libertyville, Ill., will open to the public for six months. The house is part of SchoolStreet Homes, a community of 26 single-family homes and 15 lofts. residential architect’s Meghan Drueding spoke with Susanka and SchoolStreet’s developer, John McLinden.

ra: What sets SchoolStreet apart from other developments?

jm: Three key things: One, we purchased the property out of foreclosure, so we have a price advantage. Two, we’re adjacent to fabulous, vibrant downtown Libertyville, a town of 22,000 people. Three, the product. We have an architect-guided process. We have architects on staff as well as working with different firms.

ss: The quality of the architects is excellent. They’re not just giving lip service to design. A house can have less square footage, but it’s got to be better quality. John has 21 of 26 homes sold and has increased prices by 15 percent to 18 percent. Quality is what people are looking for, and a sense of community.

ra: Sarah, how did you come to build the NSB Showhouse there?

ss: I was looking for a developer who really got that quality and character are important. I told John my desire to do a show house that was available for the general public to go through. I did a show house at the International Builders’ Show, but nobody but the trade knew about the house. I wanted someplace where I could have a showcase that would be open at least six months, so that people could kick the tires.

ra: What are some of the key design features of the NSB Showhouse?

ss: The size [2,450 square feet] was very intentional. When downsizing comes up, the press goes to the far end of the spectrum and talks about tiny houses. A minute segment of the population is ever going to live in tiny houses. A big segment of the population is looking at 3,000- to 5,000-square-foot houses. They don’t want to go much smaller.

I’m trying to show that if you eliminate the spaces you rarely use, you can actually have a house that lives large. I like to show a really, really comfortable 2,300- to 2,500-square-foot home. You make that home by eliminating formal living spaces, by having an “away room” where you can go to be quiet and get away. You have the home be accessible. You have it be close to downtown so you can age in place.

One of the main floor plan ideas for the NSB Showhouse is that there is no formal dining room. You can take the dining table and move it into the library alcove and extend as needed. Also, there’s a lot of ceiling height variety, rather than walls, to indicate different spaces. And the stair tower becomes a light shaft from the third floor.

ra: Why Libertyville?

jm: Libertyville is a pedestrian kind of town. Out of the New Urbanist playbook, the homes at SchoolStreet are positioned close to the street to encourage pedestrians. It really does that. There’s kind of a romance to a front porch … front porch parties have already started to break out.

ss: In Libertyville, almost 30 years ago, people in the community started to focus on how to keep their Main Street vital. Its downtown doesn’t feel like a suburb. It feels like its own entity. It’s a cool place to come to.

ra: Is the NSB Showhouse for sale?

ss: In early 2012 the house will be released for sale and we will release the sale price then. But it will be open on weekends to the public for six months. We will have events where people can learn about SchoolStreet and the NSB house concept.

Read more on this project in our sister magazine, EcoHome, or follow the included links to learn more about the Not So Big Showhouse and SchoolStreet Homes.

excerpt taken from Residential Architect, November 17, 2011:

http://www.residentialarchitect.com/green-design/q–a-sarah-susanka-and-john-mclinden.aspx?cid=rabu:111611

 

SchoolStreet Teams with MainStreet

From the Lake County News-Sun –  November 15, 2011:

See the Original Article Here

Learn More About MainStreet Libertyville Here

MainStreet Libertyville showcases ‘Design Week’

MainStreet Libertyville is in the midst of “Design Week,” which highlights all of the businesses in the downtown that offer a service or a product pertaining to home décor or design.

“We decided to highlight our resources for home design and products in conjunction with the public opening of the ‘Not So Big’ Showhouse designed by acclaimed architect Sarah Susanka for the School Street Development at 138 School St. on Nov. 19,” said Pam Hume, MainStreet Libertyville’s executive director.

“I think so many people, after walking through model homes, decide their own homes need a little sprucing up,” she said. “We want people to think first of our downtown shops as a destination for their home décor projects. Not only do we offer furniture and accessories, but also design and building expertise.”

Some of the participating stores include A Perry Designs and Builds, Arden’s Fine Furniture, Buss Floral Shop, Curtis Frame/Back Alley Gallery, Eclectic Design, Great Rooms, How Impressive, Idea Design-Build, Leggy Bird Design, Motif, Parkview Gourmet, Someone’s in the Kitchen, Studio West, Sweet Peas Design and Chelle Design.